SPACE 2016 Schedule

8:00am to 8:30am

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format:
Speaker(s):

8:30am to 9:00am

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Welcome to SPACE: the Symposium for Part-time, Adjunct, and Contingent Educators
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

9:00am to 10:05am

Room: Azalea
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
The purpose of this practice change project will be to implement an OBSTAT on the labor and delivery floor where OB triage occurs for patients after 20 weeks gestation for labor and non-labor related concerns.  The project will look at increasing nurses’ knowledge of triage assessment and to improve timeliness of care from arrival on the OB floor to acuity scoring.  The emphasis of the project will be placed on improving nursing knowledge of triage-acuity scoring, using pre and post testing as well as measuring application of the newly acquired knowledge by looking at the timeliness of acuity scoring.   
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Azalea
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
This presentation will address American Psychological Association, APA style, initial and classmate (peer) responses, timeliness, and a rubric for online Discussion Board Postings at the Graduate Level. These elements are components of practices to elevate expectations of student postings. The results of using these practices include acquiring higher order thinking and research skills that expand knowledge on the course topic. The discussion board postings become better learning and sharing forums more focused on objectives of the course. In addition, current articles on the topic will be shared.
Speaker(s):
Columbus State University
Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Supporting marriage makes business sense through the continued development of human capital (Gallagher, 2002).  When companies invest in physical and relational wellness of their workers, returns on investment can range between $1.50 and $6.85 for every dollar spent (Olson &Turvey, 2006). Startling evidence reveals that employees in failing relationships cost employers money (Olson & Turvey, 2006).  Increased cost to employers associated with unhealthy relationships, negatively affects the organizations bottom line (Olson & Turvey, 2006). Therefore, missed opportunities for organizations to capitalize on developing a more satisfied and versatile workforce may hinder efforts to improve competitive effectiveness and maintain positive retention outcomes (Fogarty et al., 2014; Gall, Grewal, Kadis, Lopes & Salovey, 2006; Sharey & Vailland, 1985).
Speaker(s):
Gordon State College
Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
This quantitative descriptive non-experimental study examined how airline marketing is more effective in regional markets than the entire U.S. The scope of the research included both legacy and LCC airline carriers in the U.S. Southeast regions and their use of new media to market their services to both leisure and business travelers. A sample of 384 frequent airline travelers completed a survey instrument to determine service quality in the industry with a focus on regional markets. The results of the normative, multiple regression, and inferential statistics revealed whether airline marketing is more effective with a regional or national focus.  
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
In the late 80’s, I was fortunate to be in an adapted ALEM classroom. The Adaptive Learning Environments Model, created by Dr. Margaret Wang, was designed to support students with special needs who were being mainstreamed into the classroom with “regular education” students. The design offered the chance for students to learn at their own rates, and teachers to be able to provide support to all students as needed. While independent feedback on the success of this model didn’t always glow with respect to the progress of students who were mainstreamed, I saw great impact with students in a variety of ways.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
The purpose of this study was to present the phenomenological experiences of former ESL students as they transitioned from ESL to English-only classes. Individual interviews were conducted with former ESL students who had transitioned to English-only classes in high school. Deductive coding was used to identify themes: (a) daily experiences with ESL and mainstream classes, (b) understanding of the transition, (c) opinions concerning elements of the programs, and (d) suggestions for ways to improve the programs. This presentation will discuss implications of these themes for high school ESL transition programs.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
This presentation will provide participants with effective strategies, techniques, and tools that can be utilized when teaching hybrid, online, and distance education courses. These strategies will focus on methods to optimize the instructional process, minimize the transactional distance between professors and students, and assist in efforts to maximize student retention and overall student success. An emphasis will be placed on the application of these strategies by part-time, adjunct, and contingent faculty when teaching courses offered under the aforementioned modalities.
Speaker(s):
Albany Technical College
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
St. Augustine observed “the world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.” Novice travelers are, however, often anxious. Like travel, that opens the world’s book, writing is a passport that unlocks vocations and avocations. Many Millennials, however, struggle with writing. They are often assigned “Basic Writing”; a class they greet with anxiety or hate or resentment, or all of them.  Adjunct writing professors are the experienced travel agent for that fearful traveler-to-be. Basic writing should be taught by adjuncts not because they have experience teaching grammar, syntax, and composition process. Rather, delivering basic writing instruction from the mantel of real world experience, in the context of a substantive class, allows the fearful, struggling writer to gain the skill, desire, and confidence to take the journey - “college writing.”
Speaker(s):
Dominican University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
During the 2015-16 academic year, I taught hybrid composition classes for the first time at Kennesaw State University. I discovered that a face-to-face pedagogy does not always translate effectively to the hybrid environment. Throughout this ongoing process, I integrated scholarship and experience to redesign how I teach composition in a hybrid setting, being mindful of how to do so within time constraints imposed as a part-time instructor. In this session, I will discuss my experiences, present strategies to help instructors navigating the hybrid classroom, and facilitate a discussion to collaborate on future instruction techniques.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

10:15am to 11:20am

Room: Azalea
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Literature indicates the urgency to enhance global learning professional competencies (GLPCs) needed to better prepare college students for globalization in the 21st century (Hovland & Wathington, 2009). This study assessed students’ feelings regarding the use of social software technology (SST) and personal tacit knowledge (P-T K) to enhance GLPCs.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Azalea
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
This presentation aims to foster a conversation among SPACE participants regarding issues related to teaching university students about racial and gender inequality. In an effort to create inclusive classrooms, university instructors must introduce dynamics of the resiliency of racism and sexism; yet, ofentimes, students remain steadfast in their belief that these injustices are elements of past social relations and no longer applicable to their more enlightened generation. This conversation will posit more questions than answers during this interactive session to highlight stratgies for competently engaging with these topics in the academy.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
In the discipline of Printmaking, innovation and utility have always fueled the development of new print methods. Only when the prevailing technological advancement has become obsolete have artists overtaken the field and converted the process to their own, creative ends.  This presentation considers the intersections of today's cutting edge technology, 3D Printing, with digital typographic design & traditional letterpress printing.  
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University, SGCI
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Lilith, who appears in the world’s oldest text, The Epic of Gilgamesh, is one mythological figure who remains a point of great fascination.  She is the oldest goddess-demon figure from the Sumero-Babylonian era and the sole surviving demon from the ancient Judaic tradition. Jewish folklore tells us that Lilith was God’s first female creation, Adam’s wife before Eve. Even though Lilith’s prominence has waned over the centuries, her duality and the duality of many goddess figures have been ever present. Today, she is the poster child for dark goddesses throughout time. However, one must wonder: has she been sorely misaligned?
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Michael Tod Edgerton reads from his poetry collections Vitreous Hide and Yet Sensate Light. Tod's poems have appeared in Boston Review, Denver Quarterly, New American Writing, Sonora Review, and other literary journals. Willing the word to become flesh, the poems in Vitreous Hide both reveal and enact yearning—for love, for the beloved, for words to transform beloved image to beloved substance. Orpheus reaches for Narcissus through a new mirror of myth, now dim with distance, now bright with the possibility of connection. These gorgeous lyrics reach for the embodiment of the other in order to be, themselves, embodied.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
On June 30th, 2016, The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston will be subsumed by Tufts University. An Accidental Department Head traces my experience with the transition between the two schools as a contingent educator and the contact point and decision-maker for the Tufts campus photography department. Effectively, I have been operating as the department head despite no official advancement. Using this experience as a case study, I pose questions: What happens when you utilize power that has not officially been granted to you? What are the pitfalls of contingent faculty running departments? Are there any solutions for both the universities and the faculty? 
Speaker(s):
Tufts University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Information literacy instruction and English Composition course content reinforce, complement, and support each other in a variety of ways. This presentation will examine the connection between the two in light of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education as analyzed by an academic librarian who is also a part-time instructor of English. 
Speaker(s):
Columbus State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
A variety of social media platforms offer methods of content delivery and educational interaction that can serve to enhance the classroom experience for both the instructor and the students. We look at how faculty at Kennesaw State University do and do not utilize social media for online and face-to-face courses, and examine instructors' own experiences, both positive and negative, with these platforms. We also compare some university-provided teaching tools with publicly-available platforms. This presentation discusses our findings. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Kennesaw State University

11:30am to 12:30pm

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Scholarship tells us that the best teachers engage in professional development, reflect upon and share best teaching practices, and participate in current conversations within their fields, yet we realize that a significant number of teacher-scholars are often left out of these exchanges. Across institutions of higher education, less than thirty percent of faculty are employed under working conditions that are sustainable or ethical, and increasingly, contingent faculty members working off the tenure-track in higher education are neither encouraged nor supported in sharing their work in public venues. This omission of contingent faculty voices creates a significant gap in the scholarship of teaching and in larger public discussions on a variety of issues related to instruction and learning. In this multivocal conversation, including video anecdotes, we will highlight the innovative work of contingent faculty across disciplines who do maintain research agendas and provide scholarly models for drawing other contingent faculty into these discussions. Realizing that this work is often neither supported nor easy to initiate given heavy teaching loads and service responsibilities, contributors to this digital exchange suggest realistic ways for faculty members to capture and document work that they are already doing and describe a range of collaborative projects that lead to new research and publishing opportunities.
Speaker(s):
Georgia State University
Kennesaw State University

12:35pm to 1:25pm

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format:
Speaker(s):

1:30pm to 2:30pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
As faculty-developed multimedia learning materials become the norm in higher education, contingent educators must often meet this demand without the funding or technical support afforded to tenure-stream faculty. This presentation will explore hardware and software options for self-funded multimedia production and skill development, and explore the fundamentals of creating quality audio and video learning materials on a tight budget. Participants are encouraged to BYOD (laptops, tablets, or smartphones) for hands-on aspects of the presentation. Materials can be found at this link: http://marybethbrophy.com/conference.html 
Speaker(s):
MLA Committee on Contingent Labor in the Profession
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
This 60-minute workshop will give part-time faculty plenty of micro-history topics and tools as a takeaway. The group will be divided into groups who have mobile devices and will present a micro-history argument before the end of the session.
Speaker(s):
School of Communication and Media - KSU
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Long-term projects tend to evaluate multiple course objectives by applying the core proficiencies of general education. However, students often procrastinate the planning and organizing steps associated with successful completion of the long-term project. One consideration for disengagement or procrastination stems from a student’s lack of confidence in their abilities to comprehend intent or content of the assignment. Where I define confidence as the “energy needed for transforming non-action into action,” this session illustrates how short-term planning – via segmented assignments – reinforces student learning outcomes and impacts student confidence in authentic and sustainable ways.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

2:40pm to 3:40pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
The “Good Eye” is Miksang, a contemplative photography practice to see clearly and discover key points of focus within a panorama of often oversaturated input.  Finding such focus in text and lecture is a critical skill in teaching students whose experience is also oversaturated. Examining the Miksang process and adapting it to a pedagogical model can encourage contemplation and create lessons with clarity and staying power. Similarly, evaluating students at the kernel of their understanding can enable compassion, praise and renewed purpose. This visual presentation will segue to specific examples of lessons and evaluation in a literature class.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
As administrators responsible for online teaching and learning for a 2 year technical college, we have no doubt that “quality” adjunct/part time faculty is the key to success in today’s higher education due to the fact adjuncts are doing the majority of the teaching in American universities. They allow flexible scheduling and can provide insight about professional experiences that enrich student learning experience. We will outline the literature on adjunct faculty characteristics and share our experiences and detail the process of hiring, training, integrating, and celebrating the adjunct faculty member at our institution.
Speaker(s):
West Georgia Technical College
West Georgia Technical College
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
At the foundation of a college student's success is self-awareness of personal talents and strengths. This interactive presentation highlights Clifton's Strengthsfinder assessment and the collegiate-focused book, StrengthsQuest. Inspired by the presenters’ course at Belmont University, participants learn practical ways to infuse a strengths lense into their courses and gain an understanding of how their students’ talents and strengths – and their own - impact the classroom culture. By helping students name, claim, and aim their strengths, teaching, and learning are enhanced. The “strengths story” that evolves becomes a powerful foundation for growth, development and academic success.
Speaker(s):
Belmont University
Belmont University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
As someone well said, “In times of profound change, the learners inherit the earth….” And I’d add that those who know how to learn inherit the earth. Yet, my first year students seem singularly ill equipped to question, verify, and think creatively about information from lectures and reading. I've introduced some classroom/homework techniques that both motivate them to think and equip them with basic skills.  Students love the challenge and some even say, "You taught me how to think!"  In this interactive seminar, we'll play with some of these techniques, share ideas, and offer some free, practical resources that teachers/professors can use.  
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

3:50pm to 4:55pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
The decolonization of the field of anthropology is an essential step to reverse lingering trends rooted in the domination, oppression, and marginalizing ideologies of European colonialism. In this paper, I argue that efforts to decolonize anthropology start in the classroom. To support this claim, I summarize the experimental pedagogical methods rooted in decolonizing praxis that I have employed during my first year teaching. Further, I analyze student feedback to determine the most pressing obstacles and motivation factors that pupils exhibit in response to contextual, multi-textual, praxis-based teaching of decolonizing anthropology.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
What if sheer volume, especially in metadiscourse, matters? This presentation weighs how word count in drafts, peer feedback, and revision plans identify students who are at-risk or on-track. Attendees will discuss implications for evidence-based writing classes. 
Speaker(s):
Gordon State College
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
The term “glass ceiling” was first used in the latter half of the twentieth century. Mid-Twentieth century author Carson McCullers began noticing the glass ceiling before the term was coined. She uses the phrase “silent crazy jungle under glass ” which suggests an over-arching theme that McCullers’s female protagonists face. The phrase can also refer to a universal condition of womanhood in twentieth century American society. Though the term “glass ceiling” was not a part of the everyday language of McCullers, she recognized the predicament of women across the nation.
Speaker(s):
Reinhardt University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
"Rosebud." What's the real story? Informal case study presentation describing the instructor's successes using "making of" docudramas to aid in the teaching of film history. Particular emphasis on RKO 281, about the making of Citizen Kane. Primarily of interest to teachers of media history, but useful for those in any discipline that might use a docudrama in class. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
The learning management system (LMS) can be used as a virtual extension of a face to face classroom.  Students can benefit from a curricula experience beyond the classroom.  LMS can balance a student academic commitments, athletic or social events, and/or scholarship opportunities.  This topic would be of interest to educators who are not familiar with using learning management systems.  I will discuss my experience on how I shared resources, communicated with students and assisted students’ success with excused absences.  The session will include a discussion and demonstration of Desired 2 Learn.
Speaker(s):
Fort Valley State University

5:00pm to 6:00pm

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
While we often hear about how difficult life can be for contingent faculty, some institutions are developing innovative ways to recognize, support, and include them. In this session, three leaders of adjunct initiatives will share what they and their institutions are doing for their part-time faculty, how they have strategized to make change happen, and what they think the future holds. The session will conclude with a Q&A discussion. Roy Fuller, Part-time Faculty Fellow, University of Louisville  Kamal Kakish, Chair of Part-time Faculty Committee, Georgia Gwinnett College Yvonne Wichman, President of Part-time Faculty Council, Kennesaw State University
Speaker(s):
University of Louisville
Georgia Gwinnett College
Kennesaw State University
Kennesaw State University

6:00pm to 7:00pm

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format:
Speaker(s):