SPACE 2017 Schedule

8:00am to 8:35am

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format: na
Welcome to SPACE 2017! 
Speaker(s):

8:40am to 8:55am

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format: na
Welcome to SPACE 2017! June 10, 2017 Atlanta, Georgia 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

9:00am to 9:25am

Room: Camellia
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Small-group activities are a vital tool for educators because they provide dynamic peer-teaching moments, foster collaboration and provide community. However, small-groups can hinder student growth if not properly monitored. This session aims to create an understanding of how small-group dynamics can affect or disaffect the free flow of ideas. As such, we will analyze an example of a small-group activity that was administered in a Freshman Seminar course at Kennesaw State University. Strategies in which educators can effectively assess group dynamics and help students learn to be proactive collaborators will also be discussed.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Team projects and team work are integral parts of many courses in the Software Engineering program. On this interactive presentation, we will discuss different approaches to project team formation, project execution, project management, project and team member evaluation, and the challenges in these activities. The challenges range from forming teams, to assigning roles, carrying out project tasks, monitoring the progress, and evaluating the project and team members. One may form the teams by either assigning members at random, allowing students to from their own teams, identifying members by their prior experiences, etc. During the project execution, some members may drop the course, decrease their contribution or completely stop working with other team members, which could jeopardize successful completion of the project. This presentation will cover the pros and cons behind different project formation, execution and management styles, and will engage the audience in identifying and discussing their respective challenges. The individuals who teach project-oriented courses benefit from this presentation.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
  Research indicates students in FYTS, experience a positive impact on transitioning to college, academic performance; persistence to continue onto their second year, and degree completion. However, students often express negative views about FYTS, expressing discontent about ‘taking a course not relevant to their major’ or receiving few credit hours. Therefore, FYTS Instructors are challenged to successfully express to students, the value of FYTS, emphasizing the benefits of developing and strengthening, academic performance, career skills, global awareness, and personal development. The goal of this session is to offer effective teaching strategies that prepare FYTS students for success in academics and beyond.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
My son’s high school science teacher first introduced me to the concept of the flipped classroom. Drawing from the pedagogy of a three-part class period that I studied in grad school, I use a combination of mini-lectures and in-class work to help my students develop their writing processes. In this session, I will discuss the literature on the subject of the flipped classroom on the college level, share my experience using this concept in my first-year composition classes, suggest activities instructors can use in their own flipped classrooms, and facilitate discussion on how this teaching method might benefit part-time faculty.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
How is your "educational health?"  Are you a good teacher?  How do you know? How can you tell?  Are your students really learning under your instruction? How do you know?  Is it whether or not the class majority gets A's?   This session will explore some simple, basic characteristics for answers to these questions. This is for the teacher who wants to have a "check-up" as to his (or her) effectiveness as a communicator of knowledge and also who wants to grow and better himself at his attempts to share knowledge with his students. Perhaps, to a degree, this session can serve as a ruler to measure a teacher's efforts. Just like we get physical check-ups to determine if we are healthy, maybe we need to perform educational check-ups to see if we are healthy teachers. Come, learn, and share!
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

9:30am to 9:55am

Room: Camellia
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
  Like many institutions, Georgia State University utilizes Part-Time Instructors (PTIs) or adjunct faculty. In Fall 2016, Georgia State offered its first Part-Time Instructor Orientation, aimed at preparing PTIs to incorporate active learning techniques. We will discuss findings on the impact of our PTI orientation, especially in the areas of active learning and assessment. The presenters will provide examples and data from the orientation and conclude by working with attendees to help them develop their own active-learning PTI orientations and/or workshops and resources.
Speaker(s):
Georgia State University-Perimeter College
Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Nanotechnology intersects many fields from the semiconductor industry, to aerospace and medicine.   As part of the scholarly activity for part time faculty, I propose a course designed for non-science or engineering majors, to stimulate these student's scientific curiosity that provides an introduction into a realm of nanoscience. I will provide visual presentations and demonstrations encouraging STEM participation for KSU students. The focus will be on nanotechnology, materials, polymers and biopolymers, and the industries and applications that use these.   The math pre-requisites will require algebra and geometry, and students who have taken either chemistry or physics will find the course interesting.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
In this session, the author will use lecture and discussion to inform participants about Afghanistan and the Afghan people. The country is often associated with backward people, tribal warring, jihadists, and terrorists. However, the reality is quite different. Since 2008 the author has read extensively and visited Afghanistan twice to learn in depth about the country. Further, she is acquainted with Afghan refugee women and families in metropolitan Atlanta. The author will present an overview of the history, government, culture, and religion of Afghanistan and the people. She hopes to dispel commonly held misunderstandings of many Westerners.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
 How does the idea of a "generic aesthetics" recalibrate one's relation to visual culture?  How can an open-ended, non-categorically- limited way of thinking drastically change our relationship to both the creative act and its reception? The French "Non -Philosopher" Francois Laruelle has stated " [T]he generic is capable of supporting a multiplicity of heterogeneous acts or predicates, among other things the thoughts of science and philosophy: the generic is endowed with extension but without totality or singularity, thus under-determined, non-absolute” ( from The Generic Orientation of Non-Standard Aesthetics). In my presentation I will offer first some historical examples of generic aesthetics in art and design examples, then some contemporary examples of the deployment of generic aesthetics in visual culture and finally some suggestions for the possible application of such in a pedagogic approach, specifically to first year, foundations curriculum.
Speaker(s):
Parsons School of Design / The New School, NY,NY.
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Since its first release, Chicago's Bloodshot Records has continuously employed a format featuring multiple performers, including compilations, free samplers and digital downloads, and tribute albums. The first album was a convenient and cost-effective way to begin a record label, but Bloodshot’s use of the format is critical to the label’s identity, branding, and musical practice. The collaborative nature of the compilation draws on Bloodshot’s roots in the punk scene, but its early albums featured country music, and the label’s use of cover songs and tribute albums engage traditions and practices that are entrenched in country music history. Bloodshot’s use of covers and tribute albums merge a local identity with a broader national identity, establishing a particular musical lineage by associating the label with distinct versions of “authentic” country music. This session examines the record label’s use of tribute albums, considering the star persona of the artists receiving tribute, but also the featured artists, the “original songs” and the cover versions. These projects are significant for the layers of meaning they contribute to Bloodshot Records’ branding and identity by historicizing and legitimating the record label’s early insurgent country offerings, but they also expanded Bloodshot’s brand and identity beyond a punk and regional reputation through an association with nationally and internationally known artists.
Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College

10:00am to 10:55am

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
Part-time, adjunct, and contingent educators are some of the most experienced educators teaching today. In many cases, they have taught thousands of students and are experts at juggling many classes and varying school calendars at once. Their time management skills are top notch, and they continue to hone their craft every time they step in front of a classroom. Some contingent faculty may not yet have applied their expertise in the online classroom, however. For those interested, teaching online can be advantageous to part-time, adjunct, and contingent educators for many reasons, especially in terms of professional development and increased flexibility at work. This session is intended for those who want to know more about online teaching best practices such as writing learning objectives, designing courses, and engaging students. Not only will this session draw on best practices from an instructional design perspective, it will also highlight individual experiences teaching in the online classroom and will invite sharing from the audience. Audience participation will be welcome and encouraged.    
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
The traditional college lecture format has proven to have limited effectiveness with today's progressive, technology-driven students.  Evidence from a large array of research sources documents that, although the lecture technique may be an efficient method for covering course content, it may not be effective in promoting the higher levels of learning elaborated by Bloom in his Taxonomy. (Armstrong, 2015) Active learning strategies and techniques presented in the "Active Learning – Get With It Workshop" will first be discussed by four part-time faculty members who have expertise in engaging college students and promoting active learning instructional techniques.  Part Two of the workshop will provide the opportunity for the participants to experience hands-on activities in interactive groups.  They will forge through learning activities to compose, imagine, formulate, construct, develop, and accomplish their goal.  The participants will leave this workshop with a new appreciation for active learning and how to utilize active learning in their classroom. Student engagement using active learning strategies will be investigated to assist faculty to utilize these and similar techniques across the disciplines.    
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Fortis College - Smyrna
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
This session focuses on three key elements of effective instruction – communication, organization, and personalization – that can increase student learning and minimize stress for the instructor and the students in face-to-face and online courses. New and veteran teachers will learn strategies that can create both a personalized and professional learning environment that increases communication and interaction between faculty and student
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
Lifelong learning encompasses education during every stage of life; from pre-school to continuing adult education for older adults. The type of education can be formal, as in traditional brick-and-mortar institutions, to seminars, trade schools and e-learning platforms. Lifelong learning has been shown to increase employability, happiness, wellbeing and even health. All over the world, countries, townships and universities are committing resources to lifelong learning. Adjunct professors have a special opportunity to embody this drive of lifelong learning. Many adjuncts are working in the field while teaching thus being the models of practitioner-scholar where they can provide the practical applications of the knowledge imparted in the courses they teach. In addition, adjuncts are  in a position to also model the change from the typical pedagogy to a heutagogy that nurtures and supports a lifelong learner.
Speaker(s):
Kaplan University- Graduate Psychology

11:00am to 12:00pm

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format: 60 minute presentation
This motivational keynote shares Paul Hernandez’s personal story and testimony to the challenges he, like many other youth, faced growing up and how he overcame adversity. Paul shares how he used education as a source of empowerment to transform his life. The purpose of this keynote is to inspire and motivate the audience while providing an opportunity to answer any questions audience members ask. The keynote is targeted to diverse audiences including higher education, K–12 education, and non-profit organizations.
Speaker(s):
NEA Reg Weaver Award Winner

12:00pm to 12:55pm

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format: na
Enjoy Lunch! 
Speaker(s):

1:00pm to 1:25pm

Room: Camellia
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
To what extent do introductory courses in American Government influence what our students believe? Existing research suggests that undergraduates have relatively less well-formed political attitudes; however, we also know that attitudes are generally resistant to change in direction. In this study, I look at how student attitudes about a particularly salient piece of legislation change over the course of the semester. Students were required to engage in research about the facts of the Affordable Care Act, make factual presentations about the ACA, and then write a final summary paper. A pre-/post-test survey captured change in attitudes. I find that students did, indeed, experience substantial opinion change.
Speaker(s):
Chattanooga State Community College
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Making is knowing.  As a lecturer in Family and Consumer Sciences, I have the opportunity to emulate the teachers I have admired most throughout my education — those who are both knowledgeable instructors and skilled practitioners.  In my design practice, I am inspired by unique textiles made from natural fibers.  I like to work within the confines of each fabric’s original dimensions and surface design, creating an original and aesthetically pleasing garment and yielding ‘zero-waste.’  These design principles extend as a metaphor for my teaching philosophy.
Speaker(s):
Family and Consumer Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Sam Houston State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Please provide your session abstract.   This is what will be visible on the schedule and what will help attendees decide what session to attend.  Your abstract is limited to 250 words. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Teaching online can be a challenge due to some of the limitations of the environment. Many times something you can use in a face-to-face class requires a lot of creativity to use in an online class. The presentation will demonstrate the conversion of two activites from face-to-face to online classes. The activites are for Sociology courses; however, can be applied to other courses. Benefits and challenges will be discussed based on the application of these activites in class.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

1:30pm to 1:55pm

Room: Camellia
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
For the last few years, while teaching New York City art and design students how to write critically about visual culture, I have been working on a novel set in suburban Chicago during the year 1983. The book is centered around the family of Varkey Kurathela.  Varkey is an Indian immigrant who, unable to find a new job after he’s laid off from the insurance firm where he worked as an electrical engineer, battles severe depression -- until he discovers a cause.  To the bafflement of his wife, he decides he won’t mow their lawn for environmental reasons.  Worse still, instead of paying the tickets sent by the County Board for violating its beautification ordinance, he intends to challenge them at the public Board meeting. I will be reading from the first chapter, about Varkey’s 12-year-old daughter, Annamol.  Annamol’s neighbors, white American twins of the same age, whom she has lived next door to since she was 4-years old -- and who were once her best friends -- have suddenly taken to calling her a racial slur at school.  One summer morning, despite her best efforts, she finds herself face-to-face with her tormenters when they cross from their backyard into hers. I would like to end the session by opening a discussion about how our experience of race and class have changed, especially in relation to our public discourse, since the 1980s. 
Speaker(s):
Parsons New School University
Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
The rich tradition of folk music from the Andean region of South America is largely unfamiliar to audiences in the Southeastern United States.  The vivacious rhythmic patterns, soulful melodies, and interesting instrumentation make this music memorable and enjoyable.  Members of the local ensemble Vientos del Pueblo discuss and perform instrumental arrangments of three traditional Andean pieces.  Commentary is included for each selection, along with a brief introduction to the history of Andean folk music.  
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Interior Design studio courses often revolve around a specific design challenge. Our second semester studio selected the city's neighborhood library as our focus. In particular we asked Interior Design students to challenge the traditional models of libraries in relation to the emerging technologies of virtuality and computing. Throughout this semester the course has leveraged the study of designing, making and simulating to propel this question towards a semester end design proposal.
Speaker(s):
Parsons, The New School
New Jersey Institute of Technology
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Colleen Fitzgerald is a New England based educator and independent fine arts professional. Her visual arts practice incorporates a combination of experimental and traditional photography. Fitzgerald earned a Master of Fine Arts from Parsons School of Design and a Bachelor of Arts from Boston College. She delivers talks at institutions across the country and exhibits work internationally. Her artwork has been featured by the Society for Photographic Education, Filter Photo Festival, Pingyao Photography Festival, Berlin Foto Biennale, InVision Photography Festival, and more.  In this twenty-five minute Creative Activity Session, Fitzgerald will provide an overview of select experimental photography projects that illustrate how her work merges both analog and digital media, utilizes camera-less techniques, combines sculpture and photography, and more. No prior knowledge of photography or fine arts is necessary to attend this session.
Speaker(s):
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
ABSTRACT Businesses in the United States can choose from many different styles and types of growth opportunities, but they are still structured and directed by government regulations at both the national, regional, and state levels. The volume of law affecting businesses, often poses serious challenges in defining illegality and misconduct or setting financial, tax, and operational codes for that a business must follow. The many business laws can be divided into several primary groups, depending on what aspect of the business they affect. The subject of this research is to discover how government laws and regulations affect marketing of consumer products and whether these regulations stifle or help promote the growth of businesses. Both secondary sources and empirical research methods are employed in the research to help affirm research questions.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Kennesaw State University

2:00pm to 2:55pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
Salsi and Colley inject creativity and digital technologies into their classrooms, while encouraging student involvement. Their portfolio upgrades offer assistance to students who struggle to analyze and interpret required readings. Their techniques are interactive and help stimulate students’ rhetorical thinking via Twitter, blogging, documentary, video creation, podcasting, digital narrative projects, and use of applications such as TodaysMeet. The presenters go beyond PowerPoint in examining useful modalities that easily integrate into writing projects, including portfolio building.
Speaker(s):
Independent Study Academy
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
Are you about to start teaching PT or still new at your college/university? What are some things you feel would be helpful to know? What are some of the issues you should be ready to encounter? This session will inform you of your new role on campus and how to connect with students and others on campus.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
The universal goal of higher education is to successfully prepare students for careers that are fulfilling on both a personal and professional level.  As an accounting adjunct professor, my personal goal is not only to prepare my students with the necessary skills for them to be successful in their future academic endeavors and for the job market, but also to teach them transferable skills. Some of these skills are: developing professional relationships, being problem solvers, engagement and accountability.  By the time students leave the safety of the academic nest and enter the job market, they need to be able to work effectively with a diverse group of people, be an engaged team member, and place principles above personalities.  This can be a difficult task, however, there are techniques that can be used to cultivate these dual goals. In my classroom, I have implemented the concept of “Real Talk” from The Pedagogy of Real Talk: Engaging, Teaching, and Connecting with Students at Risk by Dr. Paul Hernandez and it has opened the door to “Real Teaching”.  These techniques have enabled me to make personal and meaningful connections with my students which has led to the creation of a safe environment for students to learn and become actively engaged in the course materials and with each other.  Incorporating these techniques has also transformed my teaching. I am excited about teaching again. I feel energized, strong, and happy. 
Speaker(s):
Lansing Community College
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
    Many instructors, when first introducing students to rhetoric and debate, use highly-controversial issues to try to spark interest, but this tactic may actually be counterproductive. Issues like abortion rights, gun control, or the separation of church and state are complex and emotionally charged. When presented with these types of topics, students quote talking points, get angry, and commit logical fallacies. This session is focused on using humor and absurdity to “lower the stakes” involved in teaching rhetoric, argument, and debate with prompts such as “Who would win in a boxing match between Abraham Lincoln and George Washington?”
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

3:00pm to 3:25pm

Room: Camellia
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
This presentation explores the domain of identifying unique approaches to engaging students in large lecture courses. My experience in creating an atmosphere of student-centered learning stems from a background in higher education and appreciation for how student involvement and philanthropy, contribute to understanding key concepts and objectives of a course. Student involvement refers to the psychosocial and physical factors a student devotes to the collegiate experience.  The theme of this presentation is guided by the five assumptions of Alexander Astin’s theory of Student Development. Students in my class are faced with connecting course objectives to an area of Environmental Science and Sustainability that interests them. This freedom of decision-making which lies in their hands, provides students a sense of ownership and active participation that can sometimes be difficult to cultivate in a large lecture class. I will discuss my experience and present strategies to faculty that serve to enhance student-centered learning in a large-lecture setting. Projects from my course will be shown in addition to student feedback regarding their experience.    REFERENCES Astin, A. W. (1984). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education. Journal of College Student Personnel, 25(4), 297–308
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Online teaching requires a lot of written communication by both students and faculty. Using the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework we can learn to new ways to interpret discussion forum exchanges and individual messages. The level of cognitive presence is linked to the health of an online community. In this session, we will consider different interpretations of online community health via discussion forums and how instructors can play a role to improve the CoI. We will consider the long held belief that higher order thinking is always the goal by applying a new metaphor for evaluating the health of a discussion forum.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
In this presentation, information will be offered that explains the rationale and experiences for including adjunct faculty in the curriculum process at one university. These opportunities allow adjunct faculty to have input into curriculum changes, share best practices, and include improvement feedback for the courses that these instructors teach. In addition, including adjunct faculty members can empower and engage these faculty members in their own professional growth.
Speaker(s):
Kaplan University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Collaborative Make Up Exams and Course Based Research Experiences in General Biology I overlapped for three semesters.  The lecture and laboratory sections were taught by adjunct faculty, post docs as well as a full professor in the department. Students in all labs completed a modified version of David Lopatto’s Classroom Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) survey to indicate self perceived learning gains.  Students who participated in the collaborative make up exams also completed a collaborative make-up exam questionnaire that provided valuable data and reflective feedback.  In this presentation, we will compare overall grade performance from students who had Collaborative make up exams only; Collaborative make up exams + Course based Research Experiences; and Course based Research Experiences only.
Speaker(s):
North Carolina Central University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
This session is a sharing of poetry and stories presented as analyzed data from two separate dissertations written by two administrators serving in the same school.  Both administrators participated in separate, simultaneous book studies of The Dreamkeepers:  Successful Teachers of African American Children (2009) by Gloria Ladson-Billings.  Participants explored  culturally relevant pedagogy as a means of examining sensitive issues such as language, culture, race, and ethnicity in an urban elementary school.    
Speaker(s):
University of Georgia
Kennesaw State University

3:30pm to 3:55pm

Room: Camellia
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
An entertaining look at the "aca-fan" (academic and fan) experiences of the presenter while he works on his dissertation, REBELEMPIRE: MULTIFANDOM, PROFANDOM AND ACAFANDOM IN ATLANTA. Chapter 3, Acafandom, deals, among other subjects, with presenter's experiences working in local fandom-related media, including at Atlanta area Halloween Attractions such as NETHERWORLD  
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
My creative work arises from my time enlisted in the US Marine Corps as an Arabic Translator and Interrogator from 2004-2008. The project tells a different story than Brian Turner’s (Here Bullet) or Phil Klay’s (Redeployment). This is, largely, because both these gentlemen were officers, commanders of force elements, and though they did serve on the front lines, their lives were not spent kicking doors open and clearing houses like the grunts I knew and served with. The project’s scope is to present an unsimplified, unbleached poetic account of the Iraq war, certain combat experiences, and the dull winnowing of the 99% of the time spent not in combat. It seeks to offer the complicated reality of combat experiences as opposed to the sanitized narratives in Turner and to some extent Klay. It seeks to capture the affective intensity of daily operations in the Iraqi War—for the first time from an enlisted marine’s perspective— and creates the impression of the experience that still lingers with me: It is both the best, worst experience once can have in life and is also the worst, good experience of one can endure.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Learn about creating animated movement, with a focus on the history of traditional 2-dimensional animation and how students today are using the same principles as animators at the Walt Disney Studios developed years ago. Beginning with a study of create moving drawings, looking at animation work from the 1930s to the visuals of current media that are creating movement within a digital platform, utilizing the latest computer software - that mimics the methods of traditional techniques. Observe character sketches come to life in this demonstration which is open to all skill levels. There will be a historical animation activity for participants to attempt which may also be taken home to share with family and friends.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 25 minute presentation
Basic skills developed during marriage enrichment training can also be applied within work settings.  Promoting role and job resources leads to work and family enrichment that influences positive outcomes at home and at work (Hakanen, Peeters, & Perhonoemi, 2011). According to Greenhaus and Powell (2006), the work-family enrichment experience in one role can improve the quality of life in the family-work role.  Effective communication, conflict management, stress management, and emotional intelligence are universal skills that provide benefits to marriage enrichment training participants and employers.  Common workplace skills outlined in the study are helpful when employees take ownership in learning job-readiness competencies and have the emotional intelligence to use them at home and work. Each workplace skill is vital to the health of the organization and the employee (Finegold & Notabartolo, 2010).  Health and wellness programming has become more diverse to meet the needs of a changing workforce.  Marriage enrichment training is a useful way to gain loyalty while meeting the relationship needs of the workforce.  This session provides new insight on optimizing organizational resources such and marriage enrichment training to build a stable and productive work environment to create business alignment that gets results.
Speaker(s):
Gordon State College

4:00pm to 4:55pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
Members of the Modern Language Association’s Committee on Contingent Labor in the Profession — Mary-Beth Brophy, Veronica Popp, and William Christopher Brown — will lead a roundtable discussion of the role that membership in national organizations can play in helping contingent faculty gain agency in our working conditions. Topics for discussion include hidden labor, right to work and at-will laws, and the unique challenges faced by online contingent faculty. The panel title plays on the connotation of “join the club” as an indicator that we are together in facing similar challenges, as well as a literal interpretation that it is valuable to join organizations that unite people with shared interests. One challenge that contingent faculty members face is a diminished sense of connection with their home institutions (Kezar, 2012, p. xi), and national memberships can help mitigate that sense. Attendees are encouraged to bring your own questions and concerns for discussion by panelists and other contingent faculty. Kezar, A. (2012). Preface. In Adrianna Kezar (Ed.), Embracing non-tenure track faculty: Changing campuses for the new faculty majority. New York & London: Routledge.
Speaker(s):
MLA Committee on Contingent Labor in the Profession
Elmhurst College
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
Today's students judge their instructors during the very first minutes of the very first day. In this session, you will learn how to make a great first impression, and will learn strategies for better teaching throughout the semester. Strategies include the value of a "today we will" list, a four-step lesson, use of interest inventories, and how to collect and return papers easily. This presentation includes how to get better course evaluations by following a few simple steps that all begin on the very first day of the semester.
Speaker(s):
Berry College
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
Over the past few years, institutions of higher learning have increased the integration of student success coaching as a means of increasing student motivation, retention and graduation rates.  Success Coaches traditionally work alongside advisors to meet student retention goals. However, coaching practices can also be utilized in the classroom to assist students in meeting academic and personal expectations. Coaching in the Classroom teaches the tools & methods used by Master Coaches for student success. In this session you'll learn how to incorporate master coaching techniques within your existing classroom instruction. Effective coaching brings academic content to life by connecting to each student’s learning goals. Coaching in the classroom trains educators on methods to increase student engagement and performance with various coaching methodologies. Some of the methods presented include: • Hot Seat: Group Coaching Process • NarrativeCoaching • GROW coaching model • and more... Use Coaching in the Classroom to Learn How to: * Develop a Group Coaching Community * Customize Classroom Content for each Student *Shift & Increase Energy, Motivation, and Engagement *Use Master Coaching techniques to assist student success inside & outside of your classroom  
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 50 minute presentation
Too many students in survey history classes expect memorization of facts rather than living history. Why not present the course as historical “science non-fiction time travel?” Time 1 emphasizes "history = now," featuring current events and past times needed to understand hot issues. Time 2 uses science to probe Deep History for pre-historic origins of what makes us human. Time 3 is the cosmic story of Big History which combines all sciences in a narrative of the universe of the past, present, and distant future. Let’s replace memorization of history with historical time-voyaging!   Your abstract is limited to 250 words. 
Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College

5:00pm to 6:00pm

Room: Dunwoody
Session Format: na
Please join us for libations and heavy hors d'oevres to end the conference.    We hope you have enjoyed SPACE 2017! 
Speaker(s):