SPACE 2018 Schedule

9:00am to 9:30am

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format:
Peer assessment is an instructional technique that allow learners to make judgments based upon a standard criterion about their peers oral performance and written communication (Falchikov & Goldfinch, 2000).  Peer assessment is often used in student collaborative learning activities. This presentation will cover (a) how peer assessment can be used in collaborative learning, (b) criteria used for formative evaluation, and (c) preventive measures from indolent students.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format:
Working with a wide range of students brings special challenges to meet their individual classroom needs.  One student population that has garnered my attention is our combat veterans.  These students face special challenges returning to the classroom after their service.  Many return with injuries that interfere with their ability to learn in the traditional classroom setting. This session will share strategies that I have used with students who require accommodations to succeed.  These accommodations have been made available to all of my students with surprising results.  Please bring your experiences to the session to share.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format:
        Many universities experience high enrollment in various courses, particularly in introductory courses. As a result, these courses are often taught in an auditorium setting or lecture hall, and may include class sizes of nearly 200 students. Professors often face the challenge of keeping students engaged when the main teaching strategy for these courses is usually a projector, screen, and podium. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce a variety of strategies intended to allow interactive teaching and learning in a large classroom setting.             Strategies presented include grouping methods, large manipulatives, and kinesthetic methods, which allow students to be active participants in their own learning, even within a large class setting. Some examples include using beach balls that can be bounced from group to group as models, or to identify groups or individuals to answer questions, lucky prize drawings, and whole audience kinesthetic modeling of course concepts. While strategies discussed have been used primarily in science classes, the ideas can be modified for a variety of academic disciplines. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format:
This presentation will examine changes in distance education which have resulted in university acquisitions, mergers, and a noticeable shift away from the for-profit model.  An insider’s perspective of Purdue’s acquisition of Kaplan University will be explored.  Presenters will hold an open discussion on the changing landscape of distance education. Participants will be encouraged to share their perspectives and experiences regarding the move away from for-profit education, the merger of institutions, and what these changes may mean for public and private institutions.
Speaker(s):
Purdue University Global
Purdue University Global

9:40am to 10:10am

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format:
Work as adjunct faculty means having one foot in higher education and one outside. This stance bridges a teacher education program with a K-12 blended classroom in our roles as adjunct faculty /full time K-12 teacher and full-time associate professor. Our blended classroom is designed to instruct, remediate, and enrich secondary students. These students interact with electronic media as a means of direct instruction. Face-to-face time is used for deeper interactions through differentiated instruction. It is also designed to meet a goal of university/school partnerships. Interaction with K-12 students informs pre-service teacher education course development and influences effective adjunct practices.
Speaker(s):
District School Board of Pasco County
Saint Leo University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format:
Florida’s Ashley Gang operated for over twelve years in South Florida during the early part of the Twentieth Century. Their crimes included robbery, rum-running, and moonshining during Prohibition. Making headlines across the nation with every bank robbery, the gang were known as folk heroes and for eluding capture by disappearing into the vast wilderness of the Everglades. In November of 1924, four members of the gang were shot down by a sheriff’s posse on the Sebastian River Bridge in Roseland, Florida. Their deaths again made headlines across the country, and the official verdict was justifiable homicide due to a shootout. However, local murmurings arose about law enforcement officers having searched and handcuffed the bandits before shooting them in “cold blood.” Even though the gang were outlaws, local citizens were outraged about officers acting as “judge, jury, and executioner.” Decades later, the truth came out from death-bed confessions from two of the deputies who were at the bridge that fateful night. Some historians say that killing the handcuffed bandits did not matter, because they were a menace to society anyway. Ironically, this issue is relevant in today’s world of police shootings, whether justified or not. How can we learn from history, and in particular, from the killing of the Ashley Gang? Constance Briggs—who is writing a biography about John Ashley, the leader of the gang—will discuss this controversy and its implications in today’s world.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format:
The traditional classroom can leave students starving for more. More of what you ask?  More conversation and less lecturing.  More scenario-based activities and less notetaking. More retention-focused engagement and less theory-based project assignments. Come experience a "Real World Methods"classroom with two professionals turn professors, and experience what happens when you illuminate the traditional classroom with adult learning styles techniques used to improve retention in the meeting and event industry as well as boost performance in the professional coaching industry.  Come experience teaching methods that will transform your classrooms, lectures, and testing styles.    
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format:
While service-learning as a pedagogy may not be new in the field of higher education, its potential for creating sustainable community-campus partnerships has brought about a renewed emphasis on the pedagogy, theory and practice. Service-learning experiences promote civic and community engagement while enhancing academic performance and course connections. In practice, service-learning advances the academic goals for undergraduate courses through collaboration, critical reflection, and reciprocal relationships. Examination of a current undergraduate service-learning course reveals essential elements of successful implementation, as well as barriers that may be faced by adjunct faculty in a variety of academic fields. Through mechanisms of feedback and critical reflection within the classroom, necessary design features can be distilled for truly intentional and effective service-learning opportunities for faculty, students, and community partners alike. Four key elements to be explored for intentional service-learning implementation are clarity, feedback, accountability, and evaluation. These crucial elements of service-learning design and implementation can provide guidance for part-time, adjunct faculty members with the desire to utilize this pedagogy in the classroom and the broader community.
Speaker(s):
Vanderbilt University

10:20am to 10:50am

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format:
Today’s college composition courses and the students gracing our thresholds need more from the typical entry level writing assignments that are often mundane and repetitive of high school studies. In order to engage the new generation of students and encourage them to write more and enjoy doing so, educators must have a hook. The study of mythology could be our answer. Mythology has the potential to light a fire in students and leave them begging for more by term’s end. Often, students do not see the obvious—the parallels between mythology in the fictional sense and mythology in terms of its relationship to all facets of life. They also miss the relationship between mythology and the courses in history, philosophy, art, religion, science, math, and technology. Students who have shared their stories with me attest to the fact that the information gained in the study of myths makes its way into their assignments in other classes. So while the original intent is to engage students, make them want to read and make them want to write, the unexpected boon is the capacity that mythology holds for crossing lines within the curriculum. Infusing our curriculum with the study of mythology has the power to erase the rigid academic boundaries of old-school pedagogues, allowing students to realize that myths have relevance across all disciplines. Perhaps this means that one day we can justifiably use the front door to teach mythology as a theme in freshmen writing programs.  
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format:
We are entering a phase of humankind where our stewardship of Earth is at a critical juncture.  Everyone is aware of global warming and many feel there is nothing they can do individually.  However, the premise is to pull from many disciplines, not just science to maximize the problem solving success.   This is a global undertaking with political, economic, social and scientific components to the solution.   Kennesaw can begin to weave this awareness in entry level classes of all disciplines.   Economics becomes a part of the solution to provide money and carbon credits as the motivation;  political science shapes the policy to enable recalcitrant administrations an incentive to become involved, social sciences can weave the emotional and community involvement of future generations.     Breakthroughs in science are another aspect to the solution space, with lower carbon emission fuels, hydrogen fueled cars and advanced hydrogen storage, involving engineering, both aerospace and automotive, and electrical and solar engineering.  Each field is involved, but there exists little communication between the subjects at the collegiate level, where our future generations will weave the fabric of social, scientific, economic, and political advancement necessary to have the global impact required by the end of this century.   E pluribus unum: out of many, one.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format:
Dr. Erica Pooler, author of several titles for At-Risk youth connects academic achievement and relationships both social and emotional. They are all interrelated and must take place to reach students who struggle emotionally and academically. Dr. Pooler's Research in "The Cards of Life, when all hope is gone; trust then believe" forces educators to view students differently, by giving them the tools to be successful and holding them accountable. The notion that we can’t teach students until we truly begin to know them and they begin to trust us is challenged. The fact that our actions have to align with our words and meaningful conversations and relationships must be established in the our educational facilities. At Risk or At Potential? Additionally, at the high school and university level there is a large portion that also plays sports which continues to cut their attention and attendance in the classroom. Every school and university across the nation have students that struggle, academically, socially or behaviorally. There are a variety of reasons as to why? Dr. Pooler will demonstrate several strategies to take your professors and academic coaches to identify students from being at risk to transforming them to being students with potential to include strategic planning to increase student achievement with “At Promise” Students. You will learn strategies to not accept failure and provide interventions. Develop strategies to get student buy in with their education. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format:
Jennifer Strickland of Mesa Community College detailed “The 5 Forms of Support Your Adjunct Faculty Need” in Caleb Tegtmeier’s Academic Impressions article: 1) orientation, 2) belonging, 3) needs-based training, 4) professional development, and 5) recognition. Participants of this interactive session will become the presentation as they rotate through these five elements and record what their campus leaders currently do or could do to address them. As responses are explored, Shannon Blair, full-time English instructor and Part-Time Faculty Coordinator for her division, will share what has been effective at Central Piedmont Community College to attend to these areas.
Speaker(s):
Central Piedmont Community College

11:00am to 12:00pm

Room: Ballroom
Session Format: 60 minute presentation
Non-tenure track faculty providing amazing instructional and research work for higher education, but receive little support.  Campuses are just beginning to realize that they need to examine support systems and provide policies and practices that ensure these faculty can succeed in their roles. This session will provide an overview of the types of changes needed to better support faculty off the tenure track.  It will also describe ways adjunct faculty and their allies can work to provide these supports using cases from campuses that have transformed to be more supportive of non-tenure track faculty.  The session will also review resources from the Delphi Project on the Changing Faculty and Student Success that can support these efforts to transform campuses.
Speaker(s):
University of Southern California and co-director of the Pullias Center for Higher Education

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Room: Ballroom
Session Format:
Speaker(s):

1:00pm to 1:30pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format:
Emotional Intelligence is an integral social skill that has proven to be beneficial across many disciplines.  It is the ability to be self-aware and manage one's emotions while recognizing the emotions of others.  Though it may seem to be merely an informal and interpersonal occurrence, Emotional Intelligence allows individuals to have a significant social impact to evoke change and manage relationships.  It is important for instructors to be facilitators of Emotional Intelligence in the classroom to not only build healthy relationships with students but to allow a healthy learning culture to emerge among the students collectively through emotionally intelligent interactions.  Students who are emotionally intelligent can better manage stress and feel more confident in their communication.  Furthermore, Emotional Intelligence competencies translate beyond the classroom by preparing students to be balanced candidates in the workforce.  
Speaker(s):
Fortis College - Smyrna
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format:
My session will present my research and teaching in dynamic environments. First I will present students works at my studio at Kennesaw State University. My studio focused on the development of reconfigurable environments that enhance occupants' social and physical experiences of the architectural space. The studio addressed questions on how transformable spaces can improve our wellbeing and how the inhabitants of a space prefer to interact with transformable structures. In particular, the studio discussed "cyber-physical" computing, its social values, usability, and the technical aspects of developing reconfigurable structures.  I will then demonstrate in-depth about the reconfigurable wall system which is a malleable structure design to "shape-shift" itself based on occupants needs. The results of this work will be presented at the upcoming Human Computer conference.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format:
This workshop is designed to present the multiple benefits of using graphic organizers/mind mapping in the college classroom.  Participants will be provided with dozens of examples and templates for this enhanced instructional technique.  For the culminating activity, workshop participants will be divided into groups to practice creating a group graphic organizer to present “actively”.  Workshop participants will come away with information and materials to complement and elevate their instruction.    
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format:
In this session, participants will gain a better understanding of what motivates online adjunct faculty members. In late 2016, a qualitative study was conducted on online adjunct faculty members using appreciative inquiry (AI) methodology. During this presentation, the information gathered from the research will be discussed. An in-depth discussion on how AI works and can be used across a variety of disciplines will also ensue. Anyone who would like to learn how to better motivate and understand online adjunct faculty members should attend. People interested in AI could also gain some new insight into how it was applied in this recently completed research.
Speaker(s):
San Jacinto College

1:40pm to 2:10pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format:
Affordable Learning Georgia, an initiative of the University System of Georgia, has released 11 rounds of Textbook Transformation Grants to promote creation and adoption of open educational resources across USG institutions. Many of the faculty at Kennesaw State University have taken advantage of these grants to create, revise, remix, and reuse OER in their online, hybrid, and face-to-face courses in place of expensive textbooks. As of March 2018, 26 teams at KSU had been awarded Textbook Transformation Grants, and those projects have a combined estimated annual impact of $3.5 million saved among an estimated 13,467 students each year, and counting. This presentation will outline the various open textbooks created, resources gathered, and classes transformed by ALG grants at KSU. It will also explore the student perceptions of these projects based on survey data; grade and withdrawal statistics in comparison to the same classes with expensive textbooks; and faculty perceptions and experiences with their created, reused, and remixed OER within their classes.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format:
Adult students, often categorized as "non-traditional", are becoming a larger part of the undergraduate student body. Adjunct professors can potentially understand their balancing act of home and work better than anyone. The skills that adult learners bring to the college classroom can enhance the learning environment for everyone, including the professor. Thus, it's imperative for adjuncts to meet adult learners in the middle and help them build their collegiate confidence and academic know how. In this session, participants will not only learn about the trends of adult learners, but they will engage in helpful strategies to optimize their contributions.  
Speaker(s):
Belmont University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format:
This purpose of this session is to explore some of the core tenets of Jason Palmieri's (2012), Remixing Composition: A History of Multimodal Writing Pedagogy. The topics from the text that will be covered include: “Alphabetic writing is a profoundly multimodal process” (Palmieri, 2012, p. 44).  “Recogniz[ing] the limitations of alphabetic text as a modality” (Palmieri, 2012, p. 46). “Learning about writing through studying and practicing other arts” (Palmieri, 2012, p.46). Within these broader topics we will discuss the importance of using multimodal activities across subject areas. We will consider how multimodal approaches to writing can empower students and act as a tool for social change. Futher, we will examine how to create assignments that incorporate multimodal texts and we will practice creating our own multimodal digital compositions. By session completion, attendees should have gained a foundational understanding of Palmieri's text and should be able to incorporate various types of multimodal literacies in their own classrooms. References Palmieri, J. (2012). Remixing composition: A history of multimodal writing pedagogy. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format:
This session is facilitated by a part-time faculty member of a cross-disciplinary, Faculty Learning Community(FLC) focused on the Transfer of Learning within an institution of art and design. The FLC met for two years to explore teaching for the transfer of learning, both horizontally and vertically, across the disciplines of art, design, architecture, humanities and sciences. During the first year, the FLC generated new knowledge in the form of common definitions, ways of seeing, and ways of analyzing teaching for the transfer of learning across disciplines. In the second year, the FLC sponsored a series of small, cross-disciplinary faculty-led sessions to explore the potential for the transfer of learning across the four-year trajectory of several MFA programs. A key feature of the FLC, and the outreach  sessions it sponsored, was the integration of part- and full-time faculty from across the disciplines. The sessions provided valuable professional development for faculty participants and simultaneously enabled members of the FLC to gather data on the transfer of learning. The FLC members are currently analyzing the data as part of their research on how faculty support the transfer of learning within and beyond the degree programs.  The session will include a visual analysis of the transfer of learning through the lens of student work, a description of the organization and dynamics of the faculty-led transfer sessions, and a brief transfer session exercise.
Speaker(s):
Pratt Institute
Pratt Institute

2:20pm to 2:50pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format:
As a member of a First-Year Seminar team at Mount Saint Mary's University, I have developed a module entitled "Where Poetry Comes From: Intersectional Identities and the Poetry of Social Justice." The purpose of my literature-based module is to introduce first year, majority first-generation Latina college students to the history of poetry and the ways in which poetry--a genre students associate almost exclusively with the expression of private emotions--has become a vehicle for freeing oppressed voices and addressing social inequality and inequity. I begin with a brief review of poetry's history and definitions, including a look at Sappho, The Song of Songs, and Caedmon's Hymn, in order to challenge students' view that poetry is limited to expressions of personal emotions. The main focus of the course is the "intersectional" work of Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, and Claudia Rankine, work which insists that "the personal is political" (Rich) and that "poetry is not a luxury" (Lorde). I note that Rich's and Lorde's work pre-dates Kimberle Crenshaw's 1989 coining of the term "intersectionality." Alongside my discussion of these literary poets, I juxtapose contemporary spoken word/Slam-style social justice poetry representing the intersections of marginalized identities. Furthermore, I argue that social consciousness of Rich and Lorde paved the way for the spoken word/Slam movements' vocalized demands that marginalized people be heard. Your abstract is limited to 250 words. 
Speaker(s):
Mount Saint Mary's University, Los Angeles
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format:
This research study aims to present the process and results of content validity testing of the Authentic Leadership Questionnaire (ALQ) by the cognitive interview method.  Two factors often compounding concerns over instrument validity are a frequently targeted audience and instrument administration to a new sample of respondents.  While the ALQ has been validated in samples of expert professionals, psychometric data among the current generation of senior nursing students graduating during the 2017-2018 academic year is not available.  One strategy to alleviate these concerns is to enhance instrument validity, thereby asking the right questions in order to obtain the right data and eliminate the need for further assessment.  The cognitive interview is a theoretically-based technique used to examine the cognitive process that occurs when a respondent completes an instrument consisting of a series of questions or problems.  This study uses the cognitive interview method as a means to assess the validity of the ALQ among a sample of nursing students during the Fall semester of 2017.  The results demonstrate that lexical changes over time reduce the comprehensibility of some items and create barriers to achieving item objectives.  Another finding is incongruence between the cognitive formulation of responses with the provided item-response options.  Further testing is recommended to assess reliability of the revised ALQ.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format:
Are YOU a good teacher?  How do you know? How can you tell?  Are your students really learning under your instruction? How do you know?  Do you have the ability to transfer your knowledge to your students? This session will explore some simple, basic characteristics for answers to these questions. This is for the teacher who wants to check on  his/her effectiveness as a communicator of knowledge and also who wants to grow and better himself as an educator. You may have taught for 25 years, but does that mean you really have 25 years of experience....or just 1 year of experience repeated 25 times?  Perhaps, to a degree, this session can serve as a ruler to measure a teacher's efforts. Just like we get physical check-ups to determine if we are healthy, maybe we need to perform educational check-ups to see if we are healthy teachers. Come, learn, share!
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format:
In this presentation, norming sessions including both full time and part time faculty used at one university will be addressed.  These sessions allow faculty to compare and discuss how they apply standards of performance to students’ assignments. In addition, an explanation of the process of collecting data, holding grade norming sessions, and how subsequent feedback is used in the department to help support adjunct faculty members will be discussed.
Speaker(s):
Purdue University Global

3:20pm to 3:50pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format:
In this literature review, we explore traditional college student’s perception and the proper usage of LinkedIn to market themselves for professional growth which can lead to their desired employment. College students are equally divided with their knowledge and usage of the tool. Less than 50 percent of traditional college students are aware of LinkedIn as a professional business-oriented social media tool. Furthermore, many students fail to realize the difference and vast professional usefulness of the social platform in almost all disciplines of business globally. For college students and their potential professional contacts, LinkedIn has mass appeal with over 21 million U.S. visitors and over 47 million global users accessing the tool monthly. Proper LinkedIn’s utilization results in a waterfall effect positively affecting both academic and professional networking growth with little, but consistent effort. We discuss the prevalence of and motivation for proper LinkedIn use. Additionally, we review how LinkedIn affects traditional college students as they strive to create a professional image and ultimately make networking efforts to gain professional employment. Moreover, we include in our discussion the impact of classroom instruction use on student-teacher LinkedIn assignments. Potential solutions to guide students and faculty toward more and early appropriate use of LinkedIn in the classroom and development of a more professionally prepared and marketed student. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format:
Technology is changing the scene of education, and the language classroom is one of the most exciting places for the change. It is certainly a challenge for a language teacher to keep up with the latest innovations, especially for a part-time instructor. I was selected to participate the 6-Week Online Korean Teacher Training Program called STARTALK by Boston University during the summer of 2017. I have incorporated what I learned from STARTALK into my classroom from the following semester. This session is the showcase of the technological aspect of my Korean beginner class at Kennesaw State University. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format:
Many students choose online courses for convenience, but suffer disassociation and disconnection in virtual courses. How can you make your online class better than your traditional lecture class? In this workshop, I will involve the group with online engagement tools and technique that will make your online students feel like a cohesive group. Bring your smart phone or tablet we will use them in this session.  
Speaker(s):
School of Communication and Media & English- KSU
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
The current climate of higher education is such that there are two major aspects shifting the landscape. One, most new faculty go through no formal (or even a minimally rigourous) on-boarding process. Two, many teachers of first year classes are contingent faculty. This leaves faculty in a bewildering position of feeling isolated from a larger community and also unprepared to tackle the specific challenges of teaching at an institute of higher education. Faculty Learning Communities seek to become a space where faculty can talk informally about classroom practice. In our experience, our Learning in the First Year FLC has become a space where many new and seasoned faculty can work out pedagogical issues together with a more robust toolbox than that of any single educator. Our specific Learning in the First Year FLC consistently researches and discusses possibilities to enhance metacognitive practices throughout students’ first year. Many of us have refined our classroom practices based on data we collected as an FLC, discussions we’ve had in our monthly meetings over the past two years, and with guidance from other groups. Our panel will step through the specific changes to our classroom practices which might be helpful to a professor in any discipline. 
Speaker(s):
Pratt Institute

4:00pm to 4:30pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format:
The ongoing explosion of social media and partisan political publications have brought the question of how narrative should fit into the college writing curriculum to a tipping point. Public communication is no longer solely a matter of employing classic rhetoric. Rather, those who control the narrative of an issue gain remarkable influence over the impact of that issue. It makes sense, therefore, that the fundamentals of narrative theory should be incorporated into the composition curriculum. As someone who holds a PhD in creative writing and has taught general composition, creative writing, and business communication, I have watched the rise of narrative in public discourse with interest. In 2017, I began teaching narrative theory in my general composition classes, using the traditional persuasive elements college writers are familiar with to demonstrate how integrating such narrative concepts as protagonists, antagonists, inciting incidents, character arcs, and competing narratives into the persuasive writing process can enable writers to guide their readers to adopt innovative ideas and abandon resistance. My presentation will introduce the theory behind my approach and present an overview of how attendees can incorporate this method into the composition classroom.
Speaker(s):
Ocean County College
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
The subject is based on my dissertation research on an expatriate of the Ottoman Empire’s province of Greece. Adamantios Koraes is a figure in 18th and 19th century Greek history, especially that of the drive for Greek Independence from the Ottoman Empire. Koraes is a little known figure in Western European or World history but contributed a many areas to advance the cause of the Greek War for Independence. He was a close correspondent of Thomas Jefferson and sought U.S. assistance for the liberation of the Greek Provinces that were under Ottoman rule (and remained so until as recently as the early 20th century).   Additionally, Adamantios Koraes was an intellectual instrumental in introducing Enlightenment ideas into the Greek provinces, as well as, the Balkan region, developed a language form known as the Katharevousa into the Greek community, secretly translated and distributed many of the classics from Ancient Greek and Latin into the Katharevousa form, and contributed in many other areas.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format:
Are your students ready to lead in the 21st century? Educating emerging leaders—that are prepared to meet the global socio-economic, political, religious, educational, and leadership challenges of the 21st century—is one of the many goals of higher education. Much of traditional education focuses on teaching and learning (curriculum and instruction), and not much personal growth and leadership skills for professional competencies. The assumption is often made that the quality of learning can be measured by the quantity of teaching, which is arguably far from the truth.  The aim of higher education is to train critical thinkers and future leaders. Thus, educational leadership (at all levels) may be defined as being intentional at engaging and empowering students, potential transformational world leaders who are critical thinkers and problem solvers.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood B
Session Format:
 Welcome to KSU Flight #2020.  This flight requires active participation in an interactive workshop which includes discussion, reflection and a focus on teaching and learning as it relates to the perception of the roles and responsibilities of Adjunct Faculty. The facilitator will serve as the pilot of KSU Flight #2020 to lead participants in an engaging debate/discussion in the identification of tools needed to guide students before flight, during flight, and a safe landing into their careers!   
Speaker(s):
Atlanta Public Schools

4:40pm to 5:10pm

Room: Maplewood A
Session Format:
  Metamodernism:  In and Out of the Classroom is a 30 minute multimedia PowerPoint lecture detailing my research into metamodernism as a possible substitute and replacement for the postmodern zeitgeist and an honest assessment of the human condition.  This presentation focuses on metamodernism through politics, art, and popular culture, tracing its development through recent history, as well as through storytelling aspects related to my own history.  In order to better explain the metamodernist phenomena, it will be necessary to compare and contrast it with romanticism, modernism, and postmodernism.  In short, metamodernism is in contrast with postmodern irony, skepticism, and doubt, and in contrast with modernism’s overarching idealism, bordering on blind naivety.  Metamodernism is more in keeping with the light/dark aspects found in romanticism, exploring the worlds that exist between the polarities.  My research and observations into metamodernism have had a direct bearing on my own art (which I will discuss) as well as my approach to teaching, where I work to inspire my students to be the best they can be, both in and out of the classroom.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Maplewood B
Session Format:
Is it A Contract? The Legal Significance of a Course Syllabus Dr. Jionel E. Pierre, JD, MBA, LLM., Ph.D.   A syllabus creates a medium of understanding, between the professor and student, by outlining assignment, due dates, grades and course outcomes. The course syllabus also sets forth the professor’s expectations of his/her students and required statutory language pertaining to students with disabilities and other needs.  If students are unclear as to an assignment or policy, students may refer to the course syllabus for clarity and understanding, furthermore, if a dispute between the professor and student arise, the student can challenge the professors on grounds set forth or omitted in the course syllabus. In keeping with the above mentioned and anatomizing the premise thereof, a question is then proposed, does the syllabus create a contract between the professor and student?  The purpose of this presentation is to provide participants with the understanding of contract formation and the legal significance of a course syllabus. An emphasis will be placed on writing a legally effective course syllabus for all instructors but more specifically for part time and adjunct professors.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Oakwood A
Session Format:
Online student retention, success, and satisfaction can be directly correlated to peer/faculty interconnectedness and a clear understanding role expectation, especially the role of student-centered learner. Faculty consider the best strategies to use in online classrooms to engage student interconnectedness and share the meaning of student-centered learner. In the beginning of the online course, engaging student to student, student to faculty, and faculty to student communication is vital to a successful teaching/learning environment. It is also necessary for students to understand their role in student-centered learning. To understand the dynamic roles of educator and student, it is important for educators to review educational theories used in the classroom and for students to grasp the theory. The educational theories and techniques can then be correlated with best practice. When educational theories are explained to students they may embrace their crucial role in learning more effectively. Integration of adult learning theory and concept-based learning enhance the student’s role in the learning process. Educational theories including Social Cognitive Theory, Social Constructivist Theory, Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development and Ebbinghaus Forgetting Curve will also be reviewed.
Speaker(s):
Simmons College
Simmons College