SPACE 2019 Schedule

9:00am to 9:30am

Room: A
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
The inclusion of adjunct faculty is absolutely necessary to the success of any higher education institution. And yet adjunct faculty often feel isolated, neglected and unappreciated. Recognizing the need for adjunct faculty to receive more inclusion, professional development, communication and appreciation, Northern Essex Community College hired Adjunct Faculty Fellows to address this challenge. In this interactive session, we will share with you some of the initiatives that have started to create positive change at NECC.  
Speaker(s):
Northern Essex Community College
Room: B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
In this brief workshp, participants will learn how to use case studies effectively.   Using a case that Dr. Bilanich, the presenter, developed specifically for this program, participants will work in small teams to review the situation and come up with their suggestions for the case protagonist.  Small teams will share their suggestions in the general session, followed by closing remarks by the presenter.    
Speaker(s):
University of Denver, Daniels College of Business
Room: C
Session Format:
Though not as old as other collegiate disciplines, composition--the study of communicating through the written word--has quickly risen to a place in prominence in most American higher education institutions. Most schools now require one or two composition-heavy courses for freshman or sophomores wherein new students gain essential skills for writing papers and communicating outside of college. While most schools have come to agree on the importance of these courses, few agree on how to teach composition. This panel will provide insight into some of the current arguments for how to teach, from the pedagogically theoretical to the immediately practical. All three panelist will focus on ways to increase student engagement, be it with subject matter, their own internal biases, or the core of their argument.
Speaker(s):
Dominican University
Room: D
Session Format:
Many college students ponder on the notion of “what to do when I grow up”.  Yet, integrating motivational instruction aiding student’s gainful entrance into the workplace is not the singular responsibility of career and/or academic advisors. Albert Bandura’s seminal social cognitive theory provides methodologies to improve student academic behavior, motivation and self-efficacy. Utilizing aspects of Bandura’s social cognitive theory, the learning objectives of this interactive microlearning roundtable are for part-time, full-time, and adjunct faculty to be able to integrate four motivational career development best practices: ponder, plan, persist, and praise, within instruction. The roundtable will underscore strategies for faculty to coalesce career development curriculum into existing college classroom instruction.     
Speaker(s):
Dominican University, Brennan School of Business

9:40am to 10:10am

Room: A
Session Format:
This session details the results of an action research project that explored how undergraduate students perceived their experiences of learning basic Microsoft Excel™ concepts in a hybrid-format computer science course. After watching two demonstration videos and reviewing a series of handouts, the students were asked to rate their experience and comfort level moving forward to more advanced lessons after performing the asynchronous, online lesson. Data collected from a post-experience survey revealed the students overwhelmingly felt comfortable learning the materials in an online environment. However, minor issues were present that slightly detracted from the process. The findings of this study can assist and inform faculty members who are considering teaching in a hybrid or online environment.
Speaker(s):
Dominican University
Room: B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
Please provide your session abstract.   This is what will be visible on the schedule and what will help attendees decide what session to attend.  Your abstract is limited to 250 words.  "30 years, 30 schools: an adjunct's journey" In 1997 I taught world history, part-time, at Kennesaw State, while I was living in an apartment on MLK Dr in Atlanta.  At the time, Kennesaw's students were 95% white and largely Fundamentalist Christians, so my commute crossed the border between two social worlds.  As the janitor-handyman for the apartment complex, I caught intimate glimpses of my neighbors' lives, and they turned out to be more accepting of me, a middle aged grey haired white male, than my students.  To be blunt, I felt safer on MLK Drive than at Kennesaw.    I'd like to share what I learned about teaching "Big History" to students whose world view revolves around the literal interpretation of Scripture.  The right's mocking of leftist "pc snowflakes" on campus today is ironic in the face of what I confronted when I presented human and cosmological evolution to that student body.  Moreover, the contrast between the intolerance of the Kennesaw students and the more nuanced but equally fervent beliefs I encountered on MLK Drive suggests that race (and class, and perhaps age) played a larger role in the flexibility of our thinking than the Christian religion per se
Speaker(s):
Emory continuing ed; Clayton State U
Room: C
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
What happens when a war hero prosecutor, a would-be spymaster, a fiercely political sheriff, and mythical band of pirates collide? In coastal Ocean County, New Jersey, midway through the Prohibition era, a quest to root out collusion between rum runners and local Coast Guardsmen was hijacked by a myriad of competing agendas and narratives. When the dust cleared, ten men were on their way to Portsmouth Naval Prison and another was dishonorably discharged. Nearly 100 years later, research into this mostly forgotten pocket of New Jersey history reveals a deeply flawed investigation leading to convictions that were hopelessly compromised and a story that is infinitely stranger than the one published in the newspapers of the day. Dr. Mary-Beth Brophy shares stories from her book-in-progress.  
Speaker(s):
Ocean County College
Room: D
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
  This session focuses on three key elements of effective instruction – communication, organization, and personalization – that can increase student learning and minimize stress for the instructor and the students in face-to-face and online courses. Participants will learn strategies that can create both a personalized and professional learning environment that increases communication and interaction between faculty and student. This session is designed to support new and veteran educators who are looking for ways to enrich content and connect with students.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

10:20am to 10:50am

Room: A
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
As a part-time instructor, there is often not a place to store materials, and classroom supplies may be limited.  It’s not uncommon for instructors to quickly fall back into the lecture routine because transporting materials can become a cumbersome task. Learning how to stock your rolling cart with materials that are not only re-usable and low-cost, but also interactive can help you to make your classroom teaching more engaging and place more of the onus for learning on the students than solely on the teacher. During this session, we will review resources and activities that can be adapted across multiple subject areas and class sizes.  Please come prepared to share one successful strategy from your F2F or online class that students really enjoy as we build our bank of strategies. Participants will leave with a QR Code that links to additional resources that can be incorporated into the classroom.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
As the percentage of teaching faculty who hold adjunct positions rises, they are having a significant impact on the teaching mission of higher education. Colleges and universities are responding with research-guided professional development strategies focused on the unique needs and challenges of adjunct faculty. This roundtable will provide campus leaders and adjunct faculty with an opportunity to share their challenges and solutions to supporting adjunct faculty through professional development resources and targeted programming.    We will begin by sharing the results of a comprehensive needs assessment and a description of the resulting adjunct resources and programming implemented at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.   Our most popular program is a series of cohort-based faculty learning communities (FLCs). We have now served 135 adjunct faculty in eigth cohorts, and have just implemented a new online FLC.  Following a brief description of our adjunct programming, with a focus on the FLC, we will open the discussion for participants to share their own innovative strategies for supporting and developing adjunct faculty.    
Speaker(s):
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Room: C
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
Life’s Unfair Race:  Viewing Access via Students’ Lens The more seasoned we become as instructors, the more propensity we have to not see the college classroom from a student’s perspective.  Our goal is to use that perspective as you interface with students who will potentially enter your college classroom.  Attendees will reflect on their former life as a college student while participating in a brief 8-question race activity.  In the race of life, we all (instructors and students alike) initially have the same starting position, but setbacks beyond our control ultimately removes access from our students.  This workshop will conclude with a group discussion on access and the following concepts:  back here vs. upfront, ethnicity, fair, head start, lead, learn, life, no excuse, non-recognition, opportunity, outperform, picture, prize, race, reality, run, stories, and win.  Specifically, how do these concepts influence our teaching environment?     
Speaker(s):
Central Michigan University
Room: D
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
All instructors can benefit by reducing your paperwork, improving student performance and maximizing your instructional time with a custom electronic project grading database. Put information at your fingertips to track student progress. Help improve student grades by using a standard format for both projects and rubrics.  This helps eliminate student guesswork on what are the project requirements and how will I be scored.  This session will show how the database was created, how it solves filing problems, standardizes grade comments and reports grades to students using automated email.  The designer will discuss how the system is used to capture and distribute student project data; and more fairly grade students’ project work.  This database puts the information you need at your fingertips and in the student's email In-Box. Creating rubrics that effectively communicate project expectations and can accurately assess student performance. Creating rubrics and student projects that operate on multiple platforms Migrating information from Microsoft Office into FileMaker using Excel and Comma Separated Value files. Importing student information into EZ Projects Grader. Distribute grade reports by email after filing a pdf copy in the student's electronic folder.   Learn how to organize your projects and grading using Filemaker.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

11:00am to 12:00pm

Room: Room 400
Session Format: 60 minute presentation
We live in a period of unprecedented technology usage in society, across educational delivery platforms, and by our students. While social networks thrive online, many Americans report experiencing more social isolation than ever. Within the academy, this is also true of part-time, adjunct, and full-time faculty… and college students at all levels. This session will offer an overview of current trends in technology use, including surprising findings about the impact on users’ sense of connection to others. We will consider strategies for empowering social connection within the classroom, among educators, and across educational contexts.
Speaker(s):

1:00pm to 1:30pm

Room: A
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
This session will highlight findings from a phenomenological study that was designed to explore the meaning that those who feel called to teach make out of their adjunct teaching experience in higher education, including how faculty articulate the relationship between their identity, teaching intentions and professional practice.  The session will present and expand upon the essential themes that emerged as characterizing the phenomenon of feeling call to teach as an adjunct faculty member in higher education and provide attendees the opportunity to reflect on how the themes relate to their own teaching experience.
Speaker(s):
University College, University of Denver
Room: B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
White Southern women inhabited spaces of peace, refinement, and piety, at least according to antebellum prescriptive literature. A true Southern belle valued family and spirituality, nurtured children and community, and represented the goodness of Southern plantation life. Although scholars have challenged these stereotypes by revealing the plantation mistress and her home as a scene of violence, exploitation, and patriarchy, less attention has been paid to the ways in which such women balanced their commitment to the illusion of domestic tranquility with their growing demand for secession and war following Lincoln’s election to the presidency. How did women reconcile calls for revolution and political defiance with their social role as pious, apolitical dependents? Did they merely turn to prayer and letter writing to articulate their political inclinations, or did they see these activities as an opportunity to incite political change and challenge the position of more cautious and conservative men? Confederate rhetoric emphasized the need to protect the integrity of white womanhood from the supposed tainting of abolition, integration, and violence, but did white Southern women agree and promote such ideology that relegated them to a status of beneficiaries rather than participants?
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: C
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
This past March, part-time professor Johanna Norry, who teaches in the Apparel and Textiles Technology program in the College of the Arts at Kennesaw State University, spent a month on an artist residency in the north of Iceland at the Textilsetur Islands (Iceland’s Textile Center). In this session, the artist will share the artwork she made while she was in residence and discuss her particular approach to creating art in response to research, and how her research evolves in response to the art she’s making. The Textilsetur Islands is located at Kvennaskolínn, a former women’s college that operated from the late 1890s to the 1970s. It was a school where women learned to keep house, to weave, knit, sew, cook and clean. While living at the former college, in a remote area of Iceland surrounded by sheep farms, the artist researched and even met with the women who attended the college 70 years ago in 1949-50, and spent her days as they might have—sewing, knitting and weaving.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: D
Session Format:
Higher education institutions have become increasingly dependent on adjunct faculty. To support biology adjunct faculty in learning about active learning, a professional development program was designed and implemented at a teaching focused institution in Georgia. The Mentoring Learning Community (MLC) program was based upon research of successful professional development programs that focused on adjunct faculty. To determine the impact of this program, participants were observed and interviewed over one semester. This session presents the results of the study, which reveal that MLC participants improved some aspects of their instruction and felt more confident in using these teaching practices.  
Speaker(s):
University of North Georgia

1:40pm to 2:10pm

Room: A
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
This roundtable discussion will focus on the University of North Georgia’s faculty development efforts to support and include part-time, adjunct, and contingent faculty on five different campuses. These efforts encompass the university, campus, and departmental levels and are imperative to the success and well-being of all faculty, especially those who do not have permanent job security. Within this discussion, we will share information about our Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership’s (CTLL) part-time new faculty orientation and the workshops that part-time faculty are invited to attend.  Further, we will outline campus and departmental programs, such as, teaching circles to discuss ideas, departmental websites to allow faculty to share resources, and campus social events that aim to foster a sense of community among faculty and staff. In addition, participants will gain insight into practices and ideas at other colleges and universities and share programs and practices that are successful in specifically supporting part-time, adjunct, and contingent faculty.
Speaker(s):
University of North Georgia
University of North Georgia
University of North Georgia
University of North Georgia
Room: B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
In the discussion of liberal arts, much has been posited regarding the value of a well-rounded education and the connection between liberal arts and developing critical thinking and communication skills.  Liberal arts education also has the potential for increasing the experience of students pursuing degrees in non-liberal arts related fields with courses that are more enjoyable.  This presentation will examine the results of student surveys at Purdue University Global and compare overall satisfaction of humanities courses with other subjects such as mathematics and science.  Increased overall student satisfaction supports the mission and goals of the higher education institutions related to retention and reputation.  
Speaker(s):
Purdue University Global
Purdue University Global
Room: C
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
How many of your student’s papers have you truly enjoyed reading lately?  Do the writing errors ever make your grading painful?  Do you ever wonder how students made it to your class when sentence fragments fill their papers?  A crucial, yet neglected, part of learning and instruction must undergo a revival. In this session, I will share my current research on the writing crisis in the U.S. and why it matters.  Session participants will hear about the multiple reasons for and possible solutions to our nation’s writing crisis.  We will work either individually or in groups to craft a writing assignment designed to break through student blind spots to correct writing and, hopefully, help you see breakthroughs in student writing and learning.  Various options will be available for writing assignment design.  Participants will leave with a hard copy of current research on writing in the U.S. and a draft of a writing assignment.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: D
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
This is a brief list of steps educators can take to create PowerPoints to engage the students and promote learning. The suggestions are based on changes taken by the author to make the gastrointestinal PowerPoint more engaging. Faculty and students found the content overwhelming. Last year the author revamped the PowerPoint to engage the students and promote learning. In the past, the end of course evaluation evaluations would include comments from students about how overwhelming GI was. There were no such comments after implementing these changes.  Your abstract is limited to 250 words. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University/Berry College

2:20pm to 2:50pm

Room: A
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
Students who have paid internships have a 60% chance of being hired full time vs. a little over 30% of those that are unpaid or never intern converting to full time employment. You teach them just so much, but what can we do to help them excel professionally as they move from college to career. This session will discuss best practices with networking, launching an active career search and electronic marketing for everyone. Your abstract is limited to 250 words. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
Developing classroom practices, which reflect my part-time position, means incorporating dimensions of my freelance work into my FYC pedagogy. As a freelance artist, I encounter obstacles similar to my students; I negotiate textual meaning, adhere to my medium’s conventions, and practice audience awareness. The methods I employ to overcome these obstacles are much the same as the methods I teach my composition students, so they may succeed in my class. Therefore, marrying these disciplines reflects my dual-role as an artist and instructor while reinforcing the idea that writing is interdisciplinary. Creating curriculum that is multimodal helps foster the arts, support different learning styles, and encourage students to draw from their own interests and fields of study. I will present a teaching demonstration on approaches to incorporate art and art history in FYC courses and workshop an activity that faculty may use in their classrooms. The three approaches include teaching genre using art history, employing portraits to avoid stereotyping audiences, and developing research questions using abstract art. My objective is to encourage part-time faculty to establish a multifaceted teaching philosophy that is informed by their unique talents and employs creative approaches to learning. 
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: C
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
This session will overview a collaboration between a large university and community-based health-promotion organization regarding research and learning opportunities provided to students. The presenter's research program of 25 years (170 peer-reviewed publications), and associated health behavior-change protocols emerging from those, will first be overviewed. Then, opportunities for students serving as researchers in the extension of those National Institutes of Health-certified programs will be described. How such process leads to students' better-understanding of translational research and the use of the peer-review process in validating program components and venues will be described, as well as how academic-organizational partnerships might be leveraged.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: D
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
This presentation encourages participants to mine their own biography for material on how to be a better teacher.  Each of us has a story to tell and lessons to impart.  Each of us has a teaching style that has roots in our own biography.  Although there will be commonalities on what it is that makes us a successful teacher, our own personal experiences will color the way we present ourselves to our students.  Mining our own biography also gives us a more human perception of what it is we do as teachers, how we do it, and why - and it is this part of teaching which gives us a sense of purpose.  Without a sense of purpose, we are merely teaching a skill or passing on a specific knowledge.  It is a teacher’s duty to not just give the minimum required, but rather to prepare our students to succeed at life itself.  In this presentation I will share five lessons learned from my high school music teacher, lessons which have helped me to be a better teacher:  fostering talent, encouraging curiosity, demonstrating that you care, instilling discipline, and maintaining boundaries.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

3:20pm to 3:50pm

Room: A
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
Bribri of Costa Rica recall their most important god was Namasia, first grandmother and feline, although today she is overpowered by a male avian god born of a virgin. Namasia is depicted in Costa Rican art of the first millennium BCE. Cultures to the south in Ecuador recount tales of Kela Ayan, an elderly woman with jaguar children. Perhaps reflective of Kela Ayan, women wearing jaguar-skin headdresses are seen in fourth-millennium BCE figures from Ecuador, one of the oldest art forms known in the Americas. Male-dominated religions (often with virgin-born boys as top deity), such as those from Mesoamerica and Europe, obscured Grandmother Wildcat goddesses. Still memory of her persists. She may be a carry-over from the earliest days of spirit worship in Paleolithic Africa, coming from Africa into Europe, the Near East, and eventually through Siberia to North America or via the Pacific to South America. Along these paths, I have been researching the art, archaeology, and anthropology of indigenous cultures to find evidence of Grandmother Wildcat. The most prominent linguistic scholar of Costa Rican cultures documented the connection between a tale of animals from Siberia to Costa Rica. I predict the path Grandmother Wildcat took was northerly and hope to come closer to proving this theory in this presentation.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
Training students on how policy, systems and environmental changes can impact population health is challenging. With so many different learning styles and innovative ways to teach, identifying key partners in the field to expose students to real world examples is imperative. During, the spring of 2018 students had the opportunity to attend the Truth Initiative Policy Conference in Nashville, Tennessee.   Ten Kennesaw State University (KSU) students attended the conference and were trained on how to develop and engage their peers and local community on an anti-tobacco education campaign. The students’ partnered with other students across the county to implement the education campaign on site and received feedback.   As a result of this partnership with the Truth Initiative, this cohort of students are not only advocating for KSU to remain a 100% Tobacco Free Campus but are also recruiting their peers to advocate for policy change both on and off campus.  Partnerships with all sectors are key to student learning and success.       
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: C
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
  The purpose of this qualitative case study was to gain insight upon the perception of Creative Arts students on creativity and innovation stimulators and barriers in higher learning situations, and, to observe and compare the results of fluency and flexibility with the 30-circle exercise to determine the degree of development for creativity and innovation behaviors compared to years of study and years of age.    The population of interest for this study was the undergraduate enrolled students of American CA college(s) programs; specifically, four-year, bachelor of arts or science CA program(s).    Qualitative data were collected through interviews and the review of 30 circle exercise results to gain insight into CA student knowledge and perceptions of creativity and innovation, and the relationship of those responses to Malcolm Knowles theory of adult learning, the student age and years of study
Speaker(s):
Gwinnett Technical College
Room: D
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
Most of the students enrolled in a computer science course are looking for a career in a software company. As a software engineer myself, I can help them understand the concepts from an application perspective.  In this session, I will talk about my experience of teaching CS 1301, an introductory course on a popular programming language (JAVA).   The course was labelled as a gateway course with high DFIW rate. For most of the students, this was their first programming language first experience and many were scared from the beginning whether they can pass the course. The talk will include the details of some of the strategies I applied to get students attention, keep them focused in the topic,  improve their confidence, get curious and excited about programming in general. My strategies were mostly based on my 15 years of experience as a programmer.   
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

4:00pm to 4:30pm

Room: A
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
Today’s classrooms are quite different from when I started school 40 years ago and when I entered the profession 20 years ago.  While some parenting styles are changing and cultural lifestyles are changing, teaching styles and philosophies should not be changing.  Yet, as educators are challenged with increasing achievement and closing the achievement gap for all students (Woodland & Mazur, 2015), it is imperative for new teachers to come into the profession in position to adapt to all students and families.  “Initiation for your Destination” is an interactive professional development session to help, novice and veteran educators, how to relate to today’s academic stakeholders.  
Speaker(s):
Education Professor at Kennesaw State University
Room: B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
The idea of Digital Resilience has never been more important in our culture. College courses have the opportunity to translate their traditional mode and content of instruction, for civic engagement and the development of cognitive schema that challenges the information student's engage in their daily Information Diet. There is an inherent gesture of inclusivity in this emphasis, because we all essentially engage our digital spaces with the same devices. -Understand the importance of Visual Rhetoric in the first year writing courses. - Develop strategies to transition between traditional modes of instruction in the first year writing course and Performance Rhetoric. - Develop a toolkit for staging and implementing the creation of a Digital Short.
Speaker(s):
San Jose State University
Room: D
Session Format:
In the age of highlight reels (Social Media) and rapid opinion, it takes a uniquely distinct educational leader to teach and empower an entire generation who has lost the art of self-leadership and the science of personal growth.  Technology and instant messages have created an era where misinformation has replaced ethics, credibility, competency, social responsibility, and honor in leadership.  Our society, organizations, and educational institutions and more are in need, more than ever, of the tools necessary to navigate the complexities of the digital age. Join Dr. William B. Valmyr as he shares new insights on the role of higher education in training the next generation of transformational leaders that will lead in the 21st century.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

4:40pm to 5:10pm

Room: A
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
Writing is much more than learning about proper grammar and choosing the right words. Writing is an artform that students, no matter their career choice, should learn to become more comfortable with in order to express their thoughts clearly and creatively. Textbooks and explaining the how of writing is good, but not necessarily interesting. Incorporating a theme around the hows and whys of writing has made the class more interesting not only to the students, but for me as well. For this session, I would like to discuss how using the book, Divergent by Veronica Roth, as well as other dystopian books/films has encouraged students to be more excited about research and studying how someone's words can make a powerful impact in society.
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: B
Session Format: 30 minute presentation
John Dewey defines critical thinking as “reflective thinking” that is “active, persistent” and gives “careful consideration of a belief or supposed form of knowledge in the light of the grounds which support it and the further conclusions to which it tends.” Our panel believes some of  Dewey's ideas about critical thinking still remain true. For instance, before we ask students to reflectively think about any external events, such as texts or current events, it is helpful to begin the process of “reflective thinking” with student’s personal lives, or "beliefs" as Dewey informs. For example, reflective thinking should be begin by asking students metacognitive questions, such as: what informs your thinking? What influences the stances you take in certain issues? What determines the specific approaches you take when faced with a problem? From where or who did you learn the thinking patterns you use? In this space, students could see more clearly how their thinking works to produce perspectives based on their experiences. From there, they could potentially begin to analyze texts in a more objective manner. Using the framework of metacognition and reflection to help build critical thinking strategies, our panel will focus on how various types of media/technologies, theories/philosophies, and learning spaces could help cultivate more effective and efficient critical thinking methodologies.  
Speaker(s):
Crafton Hills Community College